Cognitive Assessment, Principles of assessment of aptitude and achievement

Allowing yourself to be wrong allows you to be right…eventually

The greatest enemy of knowledge is not ignorance, it is the illusion of knowledge.

– Stephen Hawking

It is wise to remember that you are one of those who can be fooled some of the time.

– Laurence J. Peter

We human beings are so good at pattern recognition that sometimes we find patterns that are not even there. I have never seen a cognitive profile, no matter how unusual and outlandish, that did not inspire a vivid interpretation that explained EVERYTHING about a child. In fact, the more outlandish, the better. On a few occasions, some of the anomalous scores that inspired the vivid interpretations turned out to be anomalous due to scoring errors. In these humbling experiences, I have learned something important. I noticed that in those cases, my interpretations seemed just as plausible to me as any other. If anything, I was more engaged with them because they were so interesting. Of course, there is nothing wrong with making sense of data and there is nothing wrong with doing so with a little creativity. Let your imagination soar! The danger is in taking yourself too seriously.

The scientific method is a system that saves us from our tendencies not to ask the hard questions after we have convinced ourselves of something. Put succinctly, the scientific method consists of not trusting any explanation until it survives your best efforts to kill it. There is much to be gained in reserving some time to imagine all the ways in which your interpretation might be wrong. The price of freedom is responsibility. The price of divergent thinking is prudence. It is better to be right in the end than to be right right now.

This post is an excerpt from:

Schneider, W. J. (2013). Principles of assessment of aptitude and achievement. In D. Saklofske, C. Reynolds, & V. Schwean (Eds.), Oxford handbook of psychological assessment of children and adolescents (pp. 286–330). New York: Oxford.

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