Cognitive Assessment

John Willis’ Comments on Reports newsletter makes me happy.

Whenever I find that John Willis has posted a new edition of his Comments on Reports newsletter, I read it greedily and gleefully. Each newsletter is filled with sharp-witted observations, apt quotations, and practical wisdom about writing better psychological evaluation reports.

Recent gems:

From #251

The first caveat of writing reports is that readers will strive mightily to attach significant meaning to anything we write in the report. The second caveat is that readers will focus particularly on statements and numbers that are unimportant, potentially misleading, or — whenever possible — both. This is the voice of bitter experience.

Also from #251

Planning is so important that people are beginning to indulge in “preplanning,” which I suppose is better than “postplanning” after the fact. One activity we often do not plan is evaluations.

From #207:

I still recall one principal telling the entire team that, if he could not trust the spelling in my report, he could not trust any of the information in it. This happened recently (about 1975), so it is fresh in my mind. Names of tests are important to spell correctly. Alan and Nadeen Kaufman spell their last name with a single f and only one n. David Wechsler spelled his name as shown, never as Weschler. The American version of the Binet-Simon scale was developed at Stanford University, not Standford. I have to keep looking it up, but it is Differential Ability Scales even though it is a scale for several abilities. Richard Woodcock may, for all I know, have attended the concert, but his name is not Woodstock.

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